Ask me anything   I’m an artist and scientist. Its an interdisciplinary life for me. The oddest things in nature, and the cells under my microscope, inspire me to make art. I'm interested in the overlapping places where scientific concepts, biological images, and surreal art meet.

My art-diary is on tumblr - http://unquantifiedamount.tumblr.com/
You can find my artwork here http://www.redbubble.com/people/immy
And I'm part of Imagining Science, a living art-science collaborative. You can find us all at imaginingscience.com
'Evidence of Process: Series'
I’m still working on my debris :) The process of decay is ephemeral and beautiful.

'Evidence of Process: Series'

I’m still working on my debris :) The process of decay is ephemeral and beautiful.

— 5 hours ago
#leaf  #leaves  #laurel  #botany  #botanical  #decay  #biology  #forest 
A Japanese Artist Launches Plants Into Space →

This week, Makoto Azuma’s Exobiotanica project sent a bonsai tree and a floral arrangement into the stratosphere — and T has the photographic evidence.

— 1 day ago

My debris: an art & science transitional state

Collating the debris is almost compulsive.

There is a constant recycling in all life; and in the process, life leaves debris. Everything leaves debris. It gradually becomes unrecognisable, disconnected from us.

What if we translate a story from the debris before it is recycled?

————————————————————————————————

Someone a lot smarter than I am once told me that being a scientist isn’t something you do; its something you are, and being an artist is the same.

One day, at a difficult juncture in my life, I found myself talking to an amazing science communicator. I’m not one for dropping names, but take it from me, she’s in sci-comm for a reason. She unleashed her own special brand of canned wup-ass at me and asked me (I’m paraphrasing) the following questions;

"Why the heck do you think if you leave the lab that it means leaving your science-self behind? There are many more ways to contribute to science, and if you don’t see a niche for your skills that exists already, why can’t you make your own niche?"

A few months later when my contract was almost up, I was faced with a decision; take some fill-in choices on the promise of an upcoming post-doc, or find other options. My boss made the choice easier for me by being an ass-hat. Besides which, I was struggling to do anything other than lab work or analysis. It was hard to make any of my art deadlines. Insomnia had become a necessity rather than a defect. Worst of allfamily commitments were at breaking point. I was and still am passionate about human tissue culture and stem cell modelling. But there are many ways to contribute to scientific and artistic endeavours.

I have a new niche. I don’t know how long it will last. Nothing is certain in art or science. But there is breathing space out here in the void of not knowing what comes next. Space for the compulsion to make… and maybe for actively making myself another niche.

————————————————————————————————

Collating the debris is almost compulsive.

It feels like translating a story; one that only exists for long enough to be read in the moment when you observe it.

Today I am compelled to preserve the debris, and translate myself from there.

— 1 day ago with 1 note
#art  #artandscience  #art and science  #sciart  #botanical art  #debris  #pathology  #insomnia 
michelleanderst:

Featuring two species of lichen contained in a protozoa vase. 
oil on canvas, 16”x16”
www.MichelleAnderst.com

michelleanderst:

Featuring two species of lichen contained in a protozoa vase. 

oil on canvas, 16”x16”

www.MichelleAnderst.com

— 6 days ago with 19 notes
bpod-mrc:

17 July 2014
Climatic Kidney Stones
This is not a bouquet of flowers or a strange succulent plant. It’s a kidney stone, pictured using a scanning electron microscope…
…Kidney stones are usually formed when waste products in the blood, such as calcium, ammonia and uric acid, form crystals inside the kidneys.
Written by Nick Kennedy
—
Image by Steve GschmeissnerScience Photo LibraryAny re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo LibraryResearch published in Environmental Health Perspectives, July 2014

bpod-mrc:

17 July 2014

Climatic Kidney Stones

This is not a bouquet of flowers or a strange succulent plant. It’s a kidney stone, pictured using a scanning electron microscope

…Kidney stones are usually formed when waste products in the blood, such as calcium, ammonia and uric acid, form crystals inside the kidneys.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by Steve Gschmeissner
Science Photo Library
Any re-use of this image must be authorised by Science Photo Library
Research published in Environmental Health Perspectives, July 2014

— 1 week ago with 41 notes
bijoux-et-mineraux:

Dioptase - Mindouli District, DR Congo (Zaire)

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Dioptase - Mindouli District, DR Congo (Zaire)

(Source: crystalclassics.co.uk)

— 2 weeks ago with 452 notes