Ask me anything   I’m an interdisciplinary artist and former neuroscientist. The curious intricacies of cells, chemistry, nature... thats what fuels my imagination. I collect odd combinations of natural form in storytelling through art. I'm interested in the overlapping places where scientific concepts, biological images, and surreal art meet.

You can find my artwork at immysmith.com and print products at http://www.redbubble.com/people/immy

I'm part of Imagining Science, a living art-science collaborative. You can find us all at imaginingscience.com
"Has it ever struck you … that life is all memory, except for the one present moment that goes by you so quickly you hardly catch it going? It’s really all memory … except for each passing moment."
Eric Kandel, “In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind” (via neuromorphogenesis)

(via neuromorphogenesis)

— 17 hours ago with 4288 notes
malformalady:

Yehliu Honeycomb Rock loacted in Yehliu Geopark . Honeycomb weathering, sometimes known as fretting, stone lattice, stone lace, miniature tafoni, and cavernous weathering, is a form of weathering common to arid or coastal granites, sandstones, and limestones.

malformalady:

Yehliu Honeycomb Rock loacted in Yehliu Geopark . Honeycomb weathering, sometimes known as fretting, stone lattice, stone lace, miniature tafoni, and cavernous weathering, is a form of weathering common to arid or coastal granites, sandstones, and limestones.

(via indefenseofplants)

— 1 day ago with 899 notes

libutron:

Insect eggs: Brush Footed butterfly

A tiny egg of the Brush Footed butterfly, Helcyra plesseni (Nymphalidae), a species native to India, China, Taiwan, Japan and Korea.

Photo credit: ©KUO1968 | Locality: unknown (2014) | [Top] - [Bottom]

— 2 days ago with 590 notes
Pencils will save us. I knew it.
nprglobalhealth:

Cheap Drinking Water From The Sun, Aided By A Pop Of Pencil Shavings
Piscine Molitor “Pi” Patel did it to survive on the Pacific Ocean. Robert Redford used the trick in All Is Lost.
When you’re trapped on a boat, you can easily make fresh water, right? Simply let the sun heat up and evaporate salt water. Then trap the steam, condense it on a plastic surface and collect the fresh water. The liquid even gets sterilized in the process.
So why can’t people around the world who lack clean drinking water do something similar?
Turns out, desalinating or sterilizing water with solar energy is way harder than Hollywood makes it look. The process is super inefficient and way too slow to be practical.
"The average yield is only about 1 cup per day," says the U.S. Air Force survival guide, even when you’ve got eight hours of sun and plenty of water.
But engineer Hadi Ghasemi, at the University of Houston, is trying to change that. He and a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a cheap material that desalinates water efficiently and fast using solar energy. And the secret to the new technology was sitting right on their desks: the graphite in pencils.
A simple solar still — and even more expensive versions with mirrors and lenses — heats up the entire water surface before it starts to evaporate, Ghasemi says. That takes time and wastes energy.
Continue reading.
Photo: Solar sponge: The top layer of graphite soaks up the sun’s energy in tiny holes. When drops of liquid fill the holes, the water quickly evaporates. (The beaker looks hot, but the water below the sponge is cool as a cucumber.) (Courtesy of George Ni/MIT)

Pencils will save us. I knew it.

nprglobalhealth:

Cheap Drinking Water From The Sun, Aided By A Pop Of Pencil Shavings

Piscine Molitor “Pi” Patel did it to survive on the Pacific Ocean. Robert Redford used the trick in All Is Lost.

When you’re trapped on a boat, you can easily make fresh water, right? Simply let the sun heat up and evaporate salt water. Then trap the steam, condense it on a plastic surface and collect the fresh water. The liquid even gets sterilized in the process.

So why can’t people around the world who lack clean drinking water do something similar?

Turns out, desalinating or sterilizing water with solar energy is way harder than Hollywood makes it look. The process is super inefficient and way too slow to be practical.

"The average yield is only about 1 cup per day," says the U.S. Air Force survival guide, even when you’ve got eight hours of sun and plenty of water.

But engineer Hadi Ghasemi, at the University of Houston, is trying to change that. He and a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a cheap material that desalinates water efficiently and fast using solar energy. And the secret to the new technology was sitting right on their desks: the graphite in pencils.

A simple solar still — and even more expensive versions with mirrors and lenses — heats up the entire water surface before it starts to evaporate, Ghasemi says. That takes time and wastes energy.

Continue reading.

Photo: Solar sponge: The top layer of graphite soaks up the sun’s energy in tiny holes. When drops of liquid fill the holes, the water quickly evaporates. (The beaker looks hot, but the water below the sponge is cool as a cucumber.) (Courtesy of George Ni/MIT)

(via brains-and-bodies)

— 4 days ago with 160 notes
scienceyoucanlove:

This colossal circle in the Sahara Desert is known as the ‘Eye of Africa’. Scientists originally thought a meteorite had created it but now they believe it is simply a geological oddity caused by the erosion of layers of rock: http://1.usa.gov/1lzOREn via NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationImage: Oleg Artemyev/Roscosmos
through ScienceAlert

scienceyoucanlove:

This colossal circle in the Sahara Desert is known as the ‘Eye of Africa’. Scientists originally thought a meteorite had created it but now they believe it is simply a geological oddity caused by the erosion of layers of rock: http://1.usa.gov/1lzOREn via NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Image: Oleg Artemyev/Roscosmos

through ScienceAlert

— 5 days ago with 488 notes
libutron:

Condor Agate | ©Uwe Reier
Atuel Canyon, San Rafael, Mendoza, Argentina.

libutron:

Condor Agate | ©Uwe Reier

Atuel Canyon, San Rafael, Mendoza, Argentina.

— 5 days ago with 206 notes
1910-again:

Max Ernst, Flower Shell 1927

1910-again:

Max Ernst, Flower Shell 1927

(via japknees)

— 5 days ago with 206 notes
Dioscorea bulbifera by H Richard Ellis on Flickr.The fact that the air potato even exists brings me great joy.

Dioscorea bulbifera by H Richard Ellis on Flickr.

The fact that the air potato even exists brings me great joy.

— 1 week ago
#cugreenhouse  #dioscoreabulbifera  #dioscorea  #bulbifera  #vine