Ask me anything   I’m an artist and scientist. Its an interdisciplinary life for me. The oddest things in nature, and the cells under my microscope, inspire me to make art. I'm interested in the overlapping places where scientific concepts, biological images, and surreal art meet.

My art-diary is on tumblr - http://unquantifiedamount.tumblr.com/
You can find my artwork here http://www.redbubble.com/people/immy
And I'm part of Imagining Science, a living art-science collaborative. You can find us all at imaginingscience.com
(Bio)Community Living

(Bio)Community Living

— 12 hours ago with 2 notes
currentsinbiology:

The awesome strength of a hummingbird
The only type of bird that relies solely on its own strength to hover in the air, a hummingbird flapping its wings requires more mass-based mechanical power output than any other form of locomotion. Now, scientists have discovered that the tiny bird’s efficiency comes from the ratio of the wing’s length to its width. Researchers from Stanford University and Wageningen University tested the hover performance of 26 hummingbird wings from 12 different species in a machine that measured the torque and lift the wings produced at various angles. The study, published online today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, shows that the power needed to sustain a hummingbird midhover is highly dependent on the bird’s wing aspect ratio. During the down stroke, wings with a larger aspect ratio (3.5 to 4.0 for hummingbirds) use significantly less power than wings with smaller aspect ratios. The study also found that the aerodynamic performance of hummingbird wings is “remarkably similar” to that of an advanced microhelicopter rotor. But the wings were up to 27% more efficient.

currentsinbiology:

The awesome strength of a hummingbird

The only type of bird that relies solely on its own strength to hover in the air, a hummingbird flapping its wings requires more mass-based mechanical power output than any other form of locomotion. Now, scientists have discovered that the tiny bird’s efficiency comes from the ratio of the wing’s length to its width. Researchers from Stanford University and Wageningen University tested the hover performance of 26 hummingbird wings from 12 different species in a machine that measured the torque and lift the wings produced at various angles. The study, published online today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, shows that the power needed to sustain a hummingbird midhover is highly dependent on the bird’s wing aspect ratio. During the down stroke, wings with a larger aspect ratio (3.5 to 4.0 for hummingbirds) use significantly less power than wings with smaller aspect ratios. The study also found that the aerodynamic performance of hummingbird wings is “remarkably similar” to that of an advanced microhelicopter rotor. But the wings were up to 27% more efficient.

— 12 hours ago with 145 notes

tiffanybozic:

This is my latest painting for my next show opening this fall at Joshua Liner Gallery in NYC. If you like this check out more here.

Sanguine 30” x 40” acrylic on maple panel, 2014

— 12 hours ago with 54 notes

The Science of Depression

(Source: youtube.com)

— 1 day ago with 1 note
conservationbiologist:

Did you know that lichen can be a sign of good air quality? Small areas with many types of lichen have especially good quality air. (Jim McCulloch/Creative Commons) #lichen #nature

conservationbiologist:

Did you know that lichen can be a sign of good air quality? Small areas with many types of lichen have especially good quality air. (Jim McCulloch/Creative Commons) #lichen #nature

(via pacificnorthwestdoodles)

— 2 days ago with 212 notes
Neuroinflammation & Memory

Neuroinflammation & Memory

— 2 days ago with 1 note

rebecca-underhill:

These are photographs of my brain. I obtained them after having MRI scans done after participating in a friend’s study. I am personally fascinated with these photographs and hope I can use them for artistic purposes. Although I’m not a scientist or psychologist, I wish to explore the enigmatic relationship between the brain and the mind, which for eons have been perceived to be separate from one another. 

— 3 days ago with 5 notes

bbsrc:

BBSRC-funded scientists are breaking down bacterial communities

These images by Dr Nicola Stanley-Wall, Dr Laura Hobley and Ms Rachel Gillespie from the University of Dundee show complex social communities of bacteria, known as biofilms.

Bacteria are single-celled organisms but they have the amazing capability to form these altruistic communities. Familiar examples of biofilms include dental plaque on your teeth and the slime that forms down your plug hole.

Biofilms made by a bacterium called Bacillus subtilis are waterproof because the cells make a raincoat to protect themselves.  You can see how effective this raincoat is by looking at the coloured water droplets that were placed on the biofilm pictured above.

When living in a biofilm community, bacteria are more resistant to antibiotics and are harder to remove from surfaces.

If we can understand what makes bacteria form a biofilm we can use this information to develop new ways to treat the chronic biofilm related infections that form on surgical implants, inside catheters, or in the lungs of people with Cystic Fibrosis.

Find out more about what this team is up to at BBSRC’s Great British Bioscience Festival in November: www.bbsrc.ac.uk/society/exhibitions/gb-bioscience-festival/biofilms-building-bacterial-cities.aspx

 

(via 23pairsofchromosomes)

— 3 days ago with 274 notes
mineralists:

Chrysocolla pseudomorph after Gypsum

mineralists:

Chrysocolla pseudomorph after Gypsum

(Source: andyseibel.com, via mineralogasm)

— 3 days ago with 484 notes
libutron:

Lesser Pink-and-Green Hawkmoth - Callambulyx poecilus
Callambulyx poecilus (Sphingidae) is a species of moth found in Asia that has been recorded in N.Pakistan, Nepal, NE India, China (Yunnan, Hainan, Henan), N. Vietnam, and N. Sumatra.
The common name of Lesser Pink-and-Green Hawkmoth, is due to the fact that as other members of the Sphingidae, this moth can be mistaken for hummingbirds. They are large (about 7.7cm), with heavy bodies, and are strong and fast fliers, with a rapid wingbeat. 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jatishwor Singh Irungbam
Locality: Mendrelgang, Tsirang, Bhutan

libutron:

Lesser Pink-and-Green Hawkmoth - Callambulyx poecilus

Callambulyx poecilus (Sphingidae) is a species of moth found in Asia that has been recorded in N.Pakistan, Nepal, NE India, China (Yunnan, Hainan, Henan), N. Vietnam, and N. Sumatra.

The common name of Lesser Pink-and-Green Hawkmoth, is due to the fact that as other members of the Sphingidae, this moth can be mistaken for hummingbirds. They are large (about 7.7cm), with heavy bodies, and are strong and fast fliers, with a rapid wingbeat. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jatishwor Singh Irungbam

Locality: Mendrelgang, Tsirang, Bhutan

— 3 days ago with 255 notes
sexologist:

jackpowerx:

geekygothgirl:

The original is good, the comment is STUNNING. Love it!

So, basically, this is a symbolic representation of internalized misogyny:


My post from two weeks ago has been memefied! And has 50,000 tumblr shares. Too bad I’m not getting any of those clicks and views because it was copy and pasted instead of shared from here, but I’m just glad people are seeing it and having important discussion about misogyny. 

sexologist:

jackpowerx:

geekygothgirl:

The original is good, the comment is STUNNING. Love it!

So, basically, this is a symbolic representation of internalized misogyny:

My post from two weeks ago has been memefied! And has 50,000 tumblr shares. Too bad I’m not getting any of those clicks and views because it was copy and pasted instead of shared from here, but I’m just glad people are seeing it and having important discussion about misogyny. 

(Source: theconcealedweapon, via pacificnorthwestdoodles)

— 4 days ago with 85100 notes
nunziopaci:

pixography:

Nunzio Paci ~ “Untitled”, 2014
<Artists on Tumblr>

Title: If I can’t walk I will learn to fly / Se non potrò camminare imparerò a volareDim: cm 100x80 Tecnique: pencil, oil, resins, bitumen on canvas / matita, olio, resine, bitume su telaYear: 2013

nunziopaci:

pixography:

Nunzio Paci ~ “Untitled”, 2014

<Artists on Tumblr>

Title: If I can’t walk I will learn to fly / Se non potrò camminare imparerò a volare
Dim: cm 100x80 
Tecnique: pencil, oil, resins, bitumen on canvas / matita, olio, resine, bitume su tela
Year: 2013

— 4 days ago with 194 notes
I love you Norway.
Gotta find me a residency because
I&#8217;m pining for the fjords&#8230;

I love you Norway.
Gotta find me a residency because
I’m pining for the fjords…

— 5 days ago
#norway  #fjord  #rock  #lichen  #botany 
mineralists:

Calcite with Mottramite

mineralists:

Calcite with Mottramite

(Source: irocks.com)

— 5 days ago with 488 notes
steepravine:

Look Closer: Camo Toad
Thanks to zach for pointing out its a toad…I thought it might be but all the other little toads I see around here are bright orange!
(Porcupine Mountains, Michigan - 8/2014)

steepravine:

Look Closer: Camo Toad

Thanks to zach for pointing out its a toad…I thought it might be but all the other little toads I see around here are bright orange!

(Porcupine Mountains, Michigan - 8/2014)

— 1 week ago with 48 notes